Browsing Tag

BWCAW

The Lowdown

WE’RE LOOKING FOR PEOPLE LIKE YOU!

July 30, 2015

Have you always wanted to have a career that pushes you to do your best rather than a job that you just get by with? If so, you’re the kind of person we’re looking for. Due to our customers being so loyal, Duluth Pack has grown incredibly within the last year. For this, we are grateful and more motivated and determined than ever to continue employing more Americans! Now is your time to join our team!

If you’re a self motivated individual who wants to make a difference, become part of a brand that is based on quality, have pride in your employment and actually have some fun, too (plus, an awesome discount – oh yeah!) look no further. Apply and check out the Duluth Pack career page HERE .

Intrigued, but don’t know too much about the Duluth Pack brand accept that you love the products? No worries, here is a bit of information to chew on. Duluth Pack is the oldest canvas and leather bag and pack making company in the USA. Duluth Pack has been handcrafting since 1882, making us 133 + years old (we age well, right? Am I right or am I right!?) . Duluth Pack’s flagship store is located in Canal Park, Duluth, Minnesota and is a whopping 8,500 square feet of products and brands like, The North Face, Patagonia, Keen, Filson, Faribault Woolen Mills and Camp Chow. The Duluth Pack retail store is the world’s largest cooperator of BWCAW permits in the world! If you did not know, Duluth Pack is the original canoe pack, specifically of the BWCAW area. The Duluth Pack factory/headquarters is located at 1610 W. Superior Street, where we have been making our products out of for 104 + years. FREE public tours are given each week day and that’s where our customers and viewers can see the entire handcrafted process of how a Duluth Pack product is created. Fun fact: The fanciest riveting tool in our factory is a ball-peen hammer! Lastly, Duluth Pack is proud to be 100% handcrafted right here in America! If you look inside your Duluth Pack product, you will notice a Made in America tag. A better surprise – flip that tag up and notice that a sewer’s tag is there and signed. The name signed on the tag is the actual sewer who handcrafted that product just for you. Can you say, proud in your own work? In a nutshell, join our team today!

We look forward to seeing your application!

– From your friends (and new co-workers) at Duluth Pack

The Lowdown

BAGS, BOUNDARY WATERS AND BELLY LAUGHS

June 8, 2015

Uh huh, tis the season, it’s happening!

Yep, it’s Boundary Waters season, people! Time to take a few days off, dive into the wilderness, forget your worries and paddle the distance (or to your favorite camping spot is cool, too). Us Northerners are finally thawing out from the frigid winter and multi-personality spring season. We’re finally ready to enjoy the Vitamin D on our flesh, laugh a whole lot on the water and stuff the Duluth Pack bags! Don’t wait to the wire, get focused, outfitted and prepared for the best wilderness adventure that the North can produce!

Repeat after me, permits are your friends. Say it again, permits are your friends! It’s crucial to remember this very key step in your adventure, because you need one to enter the BWCAW. Where do you get one? Hi there, we can help you out. Fun fact of the day: Duluth Pack is the largest cooperator of BWCAW permits in the entire world! Yep, you read that right, folks! Thank you to every single one of you. We have been able to hold this title for quite some time, because of you trusting Duluth Pack to outfit you the right and best way possible.

For 133 continuous years, we’ve been proud to say our roots as a brand and company started with being the original Boundary Waters canoe pack. Even though we have expanded our line into lifestyle, hunting, and collaborations, we still keep the outdoors near and dear, especially the Boundary Waters territory.

Whether you’re a seasonal regular or new to the bush, you want to look the part, feel the part and simply be the part of a BWCAW visitor! Duluth Pack can style you out with the most appropriate apparel pieces, bug sprays, food savers and any other camping and canoeing accessories you find crucial for your excursion!

Feel free to give our lovely customer service team a call at: 218-722-1707 for any questions regarding BWCAW, take a stroll into the Duluth Pack store located at 365 Canal Park Drive, or our easy and accessible website at www.duluthpack.com! The featured photo is from our friends at Duluth And Confused.

Happy Camping!

– From your friends at Duluth Pack!

Canoeing, Trip Planning

DULUTH PACK – LARGEST BWCAW COOPERATOR

March 23, 2015
logos

Yes, you’ve heard it before and you will hear it again from us. Duluth Pack is the largest cooperator of BWCAW permits in the entire world! (SERIOUSLY cool, right?!). We know, we know – we’ve got some major bragging rights and are sure as heck flattered and proud to promote it!

For 133 continuous years, we’ve been proud to say our roots as a brand and company started with being the original Boundary Waters canoe pack. Even though we have expanded our line into lifestyle, hunting, and collaborations, we still keep the outdoors near and dear, especially the Boundary Waters territory.

Whether you’re a beginner or seniority (You know who you are. You can basically walk the grounds with your eyes closed) within the Boundary Waters area, the stories and experiences are endless. I mean, you know a good story is coming when either weather, animals, or scary stories are involved! Ps: Has anyone ever heard of Piccolo Bob? Those stories kept me up for days! Anyways, before we get too off topic… the adventure starts, every traveler must be prepared with their essentials for the stay. Each one of these necessities is easily found at our retail store in Canal Park, Duluth, Minnesota or on our extremely accessible website: www.duluthpack.com.

From insect covers to food, or a bear whistle to a banana saver, we’re ready to outfit you for every journey. Our packs are durable, our supplies is top-notch, and our customer service is one-of-a-kind. Once each and every customer is outfitted for their experience ahead, we are ready to issue a BWCAW permit. Again, we can’t help ourselves from saying it, but we are THE LARGEST COOPERATOR OF BWCAW PERMITS IN THE WORLD! (Raise the roof, people!)

So, in the end, go to a retailer and brand (here’s Duluth Pack!) that has experience and knowledge of helping hundreds of individuals each season, so they have the best camping and canoeing trip they will remember for the rest of their lives. Of course, the best stories also involve you taking us along with, too! From generation to generation and from portage mile to portage mile, we cherish our little vacay up North with you all. It’s something we look forward to year after year.

Now the real question is, who is ready to get camping?! Ps: My hand is raised way, way, way up!

– From your friends at Duluth Pack

The Lowdown

Pink Paddles and Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October 3, 2011
Pink Paddle


The first of October marks the beginning of “Breast Cancer Awareness Month.”

And while you may have heard or read the statistics before, I am going to give them to you again. This year, more than 200,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer; more than 40,000 of them will not survive. In the U.S. a woman will die from breast cancer, on average, every 13 minutes. We will all have someone close to us, who we love, affected by this disease.

Sue Prom created the Pink Paddle not only as a functional piece of canoeing equipment, but also as a work of art, and as a symbol of strength for those affected by breast cancer. The logo on the paddle is a wish or blessing, “May your new beginning bring you strength, peace and tranquility. And may your journeys over water be safe.” The Maori people of New Zealand inspired the design of the logo. The Maori are known for their great respect of nature and used symbols as a form of communication.

Sue and her husband Mike own and operate Voyageur Canoe Outfitters located at the end of the Gunflint Trail, on the edge of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCAW). The BWCAW is a 1,000,000-acre Wilderness area where the canoe and the paddle are king and queen. As anyone who has paddled the BWCAW can attest, a canoe camping trip will provide you with exercise, a cleansing of the soul, and a clearing of the mind.

When someone purchases a Pink Paddle not only will the exercise help strengthen their odds in the fight against cancer, but a portion of the proceeds from each paddle sale will be donated to breast cancer research. Sue and Mike’s charity of choice for Pink Paddles is the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Pink Paddles’ mission began because they wanted to help find a cure for this devastating disease that kills the women we love.

If you would like your own Pink Paddle you may find them at Voyageur Canoe Outfitters or at the Duluth Pack store, 365 Canal Park Drive in Duluth. 218 • 722 • 1707 And, while you are in the Duluth Pack store, please check out the other Breast Cancer Awareness Month items in pink.

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Techniques & Advice, The Lowdown

How to remove the Y-bones from a Northern Pike

September 23, 2011
A fisherman goes after the y-bones on a Northern

It has to be one of the toughest skills to learn as a fisherman, getting those annoying y-bones out cleanly from a Northern Pike filet. Speaking for myself, I have not conquered the skill, so I have called upon a master fisherman to provide some expertise. Realizing there are several ways to filet a fish, this just happens to be the way I was taught. The instructions below will be a paraphrase and combination of two styles.

Personally, I like a very sharp knife with a thin blade. I have two Rapala knives and I prefer the thinner blade which seems to be sharper and much more flexible. Some people prefer a blade not as sharp, this is really a personal preference.

1. Filet the fish as you normally would, taking the ribs out and leaving the skin on. Hold your knife vertically and take a quick swipe of the filet to expose the remaining bones. Important to remember that pike bones angle upwards toward the spine of the fish.

2. You will see two lines on the fish, one solid white and one broken (these are the tips of the y-bones), approximately 1/4 to 3/4 of an inch apart. Between the solid white line and the y-bones cut vertically 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep from the head of the filet to the start of the anal fin.

3. Just outside of the broken line (y-bones), cut 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep from the head of the filet to the start of the anal fin. Go easy here, you don’t want to cut through the bones.

4. Going back to the y-bone line cut you just made cut 1/2 inch horizontally following the bones to their end. There is a gentle twisting motion to the knife as you follow the y-bones, slicing gently.

5. Now go back and cut again, making 1/2 cuts until you get to the end. Do not slice through the skin or come out the end of the filet, remembering that the bones should end about 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch from the skin.

6. On the solid line slice horizontally on the underside of the y-bones working from head to tail. Again, use that twisting motion as you follow the y-bones. You will see your blade through the opening side of the previous cuts as you work. Continue this until all the y-bones have been removed.

As with everything, this takes practice to become proficient. While I am still working on this skill my filets are looking less like something the dog has chewed on and something more worthy of the fry pan.

In the canoe pack I like to provide extra protection to my good knives, filet or otherwise. A good, hard case will do two things for you; 1. it will help keep those expensive knives from dulling or bending while in the pack. And 2. the hard case will keep the very sharp blades from exiting the canvas utensil roll or side of my Duluth Pack while bumping across a portage.

Enjoy, and fish on!

The Lowdown, Trip Planning

BWCAW Bears and Canoe Packs

August 19, 2011
Black Bear in Woods

It has just been one of those summers in which the black bears of Minnesota have visited a lot of campsites in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). Visitors to the wilderness must continue to be ever vigilant and keep the campsite clean to remove any and all temptations for curious and hungry bears.

Here is the latest I have on our furry friends in the north woods:

There is a bear or bears making the rounds on Bonnie Lake and most likely venturing into the Knife Lake area as well. Reports tell us that a large, persistent bear has been coming into camp on Bonnie Lake during daylight hours looking for a snack. This bear was so unnerving to a group that they moved camp up to Knife.

Another report from Knife Lake, involving possibly the same bear, states that a food pack was damaged and another one was taken. Advice is to keep those campsites clean, and hang those packs when possible.

Back to the west on Basswood Lake there are several reports of a bear or bears with their hungry eyes on food packs. Bears on and around Pipestone Bay have made themselves known through visible activity and raids on some campsites.

On Basswood’s Washington Island a bear tore a screen tent and stole a food pack while the group was out fishing. The report doesn’t state whether the pack was in the screen tent at the time of the pilfering. Doesn’t matter anyway because my advice is always the same: keep any and all food out of the tents. A thin layer of nylon will not stop a hungry bear.

The above report also reminds me to offer this advice: please take your food barrel or pack with you when you leave camp on a day trip. We all love our ursine friends, but let’s remove as much temptation as possible when traveling in areas known for bears with a penchant for thievery.

Still lots of summer left out there, get on the water and enjoy it!

Boundary Waters bear report for July 1, 2011

Dear Bears, keep your paws off my canoe packs

 

Gear Talk, The Lowdown

Bending Branches debuts their new Black Pearl carbon fiber paddle

August 11, 2011
The new carbon fiber paddle from Bending Branches

Hard charging, performance-touring paddlers are going to love the new Black Pearl carbon fiber canoe paddle from Bending Branches. Made from high tech materials and coming in at just 14 ounces this paddle will be a great addition for your lightweight Kevlar canoe. The company recently debuted the new Black Pearl paddle at the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market, 2011.

American made Bending Branches (BB) was founded in 1982 by whitewater paddlers Dale Kicker and Ron Hultman. By building composite paddles with Kevlar tip guards, which became known as rock guards, they revolutionized the industry and changed paddling forever. This small, privately held company in Wisconsin has built more than one million paddles for canoeists and kayakers.

The Black Pearl was built as an answer to Bending Branches customers who own and paddle high-end canoes built of Kevlar or carbon fiber. They wanted a lightweight, strong paddle to match well with their lightweight boat. The Black Pearl gives them the ability to partner a high tech touring paddle with their high tech boat.

It starts with a carbon fiber touring blade paired with a carbon fiber composite shaft, a very stiff, light combination. The paddle is topped off with a carbon grip built to fit the paddlers’ hand. Dale Kicker has said he believes it to be the most comfortable grip they have built. At 14 ounces this paddle possesses an extremely high strength to weight ratio, and with the large touring blade it is maximum efficiency on the canoe trail.

This paddle will be ideal for the canoeist who likes to have the newest, fastest technology in their hands. And, has been waiting for a high-end paddle to pair with their high-end boat for outstanding performance touring.

Grab one of these paddles today, get your canoe pack out of the garage, and be ready for the Boundary Waters tomorrow. And don’t forget one for you bowman, too.

Portage me back to DuluthPack.com

 

Techniques & Advice, The Lowdown, Trip Planning

Dear Bears, keep your paws off my canoe packs

July 29, 2011
This large black bear would love to peek in your canoe packs

It’s Blueberry Festival weekend in Ely, Minnesota! And, being that blueberries are one of the favorite treats of our big, black friends it is time for another bear report from the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

Two weeks ago a bear on Disappointment Lake tore into a food pack that was hanging from a tree. Bears are determined and don’t care that Cinco de Mayo has passed; therefore they love to play piñata with a hanging canvas backpack.

Please make sure your hanging pack is well off the ground, as much as 12 feet or more. Also, keep the pack away from the tree trunk. A hungry bear will climb the tree and reach out or climb out to get your pack.

Better yet…throw your food pack in the canoe when you leave for the day.

Yogi and Boo-boo are much smarter than you think. A bear on Basswood Lake came into camp and was able to crack open a bear-resistant container. According to the North American Bear Center in Ely, a bear will make 40 attempts at a food source before giving up. More proof that there is no such thing as a “bear-proof” container.

Like humans, bears are creatures of habit, when they find a campsite, or a series of campsites that have food they will make regular rounds. One such bear is on Malberg Lake, he just keeps coming around looking for a handout. And while he may not find or take anything, he visits camp multiple times.

Many bears have just simply lost their apprehensiveness around humans. There is a bear in the Upper Basswood Falls area that has been trying to get invited to a campsite breakfast. Last week, one group of campers didn’t feel like guests early in the morning, so they left without telling the bear.

Keep your camp clean. Hang your food pack. And NEVER take food into the tent.

Have a great time on the water, and send me some photos!

Paddle me back to DuluthPack.com

 

The Lowdown, Trip Planning

Forest Fires and the Sunset

July 25, 2011
A Bombardier fire plane lifts off the surface of the lake.

Imagine this: your boat is full of canoe packs and pushing hard westward into the setting sun. Both the fishing rod and the camera are out as you try and grab a few walleyes and some great shots of the amazing sunset. It is almost time to find a campsite, but you just aren’t ready to leave the water yet. The sun dipping below

the horizon has captivated you and your bowman, both.

The sky is full of reds, oranges, and pinks as if it is ablaze tonight. And in some ways it is on fire tonight, or at the very least fires are contributing to the brilliant sunset. What is creating these vivid sunsets are the fires burning in Canada, specifically Ontario. As the smoke fills the air and drifts into the U.S. it creates the crimson and other colors you see as the sun goes down in the evening.

As of July 24, 2011 there were 118 fires burning in Ontario, with new ones reported each day. At the present time there are fire restrictions in the northwest portion of the province. Currently, those restrictions do not include Quetico Provincial Park, but the Ministry of Natural Resources is asking everyone to be vigilant about fire prevention.

In terms of the “Made in America” fires, not so many are burning at the present time. The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) saw two small fires burning on Kekekabic Lake, but those are now winding down and should be no threat to paddlers.

Remember to keep your campfires within the fire ring, and under control. Please put your fire out completely before going to bed, or leaving the campsite for the day. And while the BWCAW has been wet this season, it doesn’t take much for a fire to get out of control and cause a lot of damage.

Enjoy those colorful sunrises and sunsets, and get out on the water!

Help me get back to the DuluthPack.com homepage.

The Lowdown, Trip Planning

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Open for Fishing

July 8, 2011
A nice smallie resides in a fly fisherman's net

A nice smallie resides in a fly fisherman's net

In last week’s blog I gave you an update on bear reports coming from the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. As of this writing not much has changed, and no new problem bears have been reported. Keep your camp clean, protect your food pack, and all will be good.

Here in Duluth we have one curious bear making news and that is Dylan the Bear out on Park Point. Seems Dylan swam across from Superior, WI sometime in May and has been raiding the local bird feeders. Other than a few upset robins and finches he hasn’t been much trouble. However, there is a live trap set for him in an effort to relocate Dylan to a less residential neck of the woods.

The news I have for you today is two-fold; first, the BWCAW is open and unaffected by the state government shut down in Minnesota. Second, the fish are biting, and it is time to get out on the water. After spending some time roaming around at recreation.gov (that’s where you reserve your BWCAW permit) it is apparent there are still permits to be had for good entry points. Book a permit today, and then choose the Duluth Pack store in Canal Park as your permit issue station.

The bait shops in Grand Marais are reporting that fishing is good in general in the east end of the BWCAW. Walleyes are starting to slow down, but if you know where to find them a shore lunch is in your future. Smallmouth bass are being caught while still in shallow water in the lakes. Fishermen are finding surface lures and very shallow runners are catching these smallies.

The report out of Ely is a little bit different; walleyes are being caught at a pretty good pace in 12 to 18 feet of water. In the evenings they are coming shallower onto structure in the eight-foot range. At the present time anglers seem to be having the best luck with leeches. Smallmouth bass in the Ely area are running a bit deeper than their eastern brothers. Fisherman are catching smallies in five to eight feet of water on Rapalas and other shallow to medium running lures.

If you are a fly fisherman, and would love to see some flies tied this Saturday, July 9, head on over to the Duluth Pack store at 365 Canal Park Drive. EJ from the Great Lake Fly shop will be there from noon to 3:00 p.m. demonstrating his tying abilities with flies and streamers made to entice the big ones. As always there is no charge for the fish stories or other lies told.

Get out there and enjoy the adventure!

I am completely hooked! Take me back to DuluthPack.com