Browsing Tag


The Lowdown


June 15, 2015

Let’s give it to the father’s in all of our lives. Make this Father’s Day memorable and one-of-a-kind just like your dad is to you.

They are our providers, supporters, pushers and our go-to protectors in this glorious life. When I think of my dad, I feel I could rant, rave and never stop talking about how proud I am to share the same last name as him. For all the positives he posses, I just hope I can be half the person he is.

Father’s Day gifting can be such a head scratcher. What do you gift the best man in your life? How can you forever thank him for what he does in one day designated for him? It’s time to step up the gifting process for the man who taught you how to ride a bike and say how much he means to you beyond tools and grilling utensils. Here is the gift guide for being original and finding a unique product that will have your pop saying, “thank you” rather than “you’re welcome”!

If your dad is the rugged, get dirty in the mud and eat ribs off the bone and not use a napkin kind of man’s man then do we have the bag for his every need. Welcome the Duluth Pack Rambler Pack. Even the name just sounds hunky! The minute he gets his paws on this bag, it’s never leaving his site. Shop the Rambler Pack here .


Maybe your father is the clean cut, get the job done, smoke a cigar on the porch after wearing a suit all day kind of gent. We can compliment his style with ease! The number one selling category of Duluth Pack products is our Portfolio Collection. They all posse a design element that differs from one another, but all include the sleek and timeless style all with packing the Made in America and Lifetime Guaranteed punch that he desires. If he’s into some meat on his bag, the Builder’s Portfolio will carry all of his work necessities plus more! This bad boy is available in all leather options along with our canvas selection as well. Shop this bag here .


If your daddio is a sharp shooter, enjoys campfire coffee (mmm so good!) and looks forward to the days in a deer stand or on the water fishing, we’ve got the gadgets. For the man who wakes up before dawn, dresses in his camo and waits for the perfect hunt – here are his dream gun cases. The first if our legendary rifle cases. Available in different lengths along with american leather, our tough as nails canvas and the beautiful American Bison Leather edition found here . If your dad finds pure bliss on the open blue, a line between his hands and the adrenaline rush when a fish is on the hook, we can help make his experience even better. The Duluth Pack Soft Sided Tackle Box will just be the trick. Get one for him here .



Last but certainly not least, if your pops is the type of guy who is constantly on the go, he needs a travel companion that he can count on while he is away from you and the family. The show stopping Duluth Pack Sportsman’s Duffle comes with so much bang for it’s buck. Not only is it handcrafted right here in Duluth, Minnesota, USA, but it’s made of authentic American Bison Leather. Each hide is unique to one another and this piece can stand alone, plus holding from his toothbrush, to his shoes to the electronic device he relies on. Trust us, he’ll be forever grateful for THIS piece.


We hope these helpful hints and tricks for this upcoming Father’s Day will make gifting a smooth ride rather than a stressful endeavor!

An early Happy Father’s Day to all on the wonderful dads out there!

– From your friends at Duluth Pack

Techniques & Advice, The Lowdown

How to remove the Y-bones from a Northern Pike

September 23, 2011
A fisherman goes after the y-bones on a Northern

It has to be one of the toughest skills to learn as a fisherman, getting those annoying y-bones out cleanly from a Northern Pike filet. Speaking for myself, I have not conquered the skill, so I have called upon a master fisherman to provide some expertise. Realizing there are several ways to filet a fish, this just happens to be the way I was taught. The instructions below will be a paraphrase and combination of two styles.

Personally, I like a very sharp knife with a thin blade. I have two Rapala knives and I prefer the thinner blade which seems to be sharper and much more flexible. Some people prefer a blade not as sharp, this is really a personal preference.

1. Filet the fish as you normally would, taking the ribs out and leaving the skin on. Hold your knife vertically and take a quick swipe of the filet to expose the remaining bones. Important to remember that pike bones angle upwards toward the spine of the fish.

2. You will see two lines on the fish, one solid white and one broken (these are the tips of the y-bones), approximately 1/4 to 3/4 of an inch apart. Between the solid white line and the y-bones cut vertically 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep from the head of the filet to the start of the anal fin.

3. Just outside of the broken line (y-bones), cut 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep from the head of the filet to the start of the anal fin. Go easy here, you don’t want to cut through the bones.

4. Going back to the y-bone line cut you just made cut 1/2 inch horizontally following the bones to their end. There is a gentle twisting motion to the knife as you follow the y-bones, slicing gently.

5. Now go back and cut again, making 1/2 cuts until you get to the end. Do not slice through the skin or come out the end of the filet, remembering that the bones should end about 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch from the skin.

6. On the solid line slice horizontally on the underside of the y-bones working from head to tail. Again, use that twisting motion as you follow the y-bones. You will see your blade through the opening side of the previous cuts as you work. Continue this until all the y-bones have been removed.

As with everything, this takes practice to become proficient. While I am still working on this skill my filets are looking less like something the dog has chewed on and something more worthy of the fry pan.

In the canoe pack I like to provide extra protection to my good knives, filet or otherwise. A good, hard case will do two things for you; 1. it will help keep those expensive knives from dulling or bending while in the pack. And 2. the hard case will keep the very sharp blades from exiting the canvas utensil roll or side of my Duluth Pack while bumping across a portage.

Enjoy, and fish on!